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Gazetteer of Greater Manchester Placenames – 1


Districts
& Townships of the Metropolitan County

An alphabetical
listing of townships, Civil Parishes, Ecclesiastical Parishes, Boroughs,
Rural and Urban Districts, localities, villages, counties and hamlets
lying within, or formally within, the Greater Manchester Metropolitan
County, including the origins of placenames. Much of this information
was gathered from the Domesday Survey of 1086 and other subsequent records
and from Greater Manchester County Record Office – for more information
on the latter, visit the website at: https://www.gmcro.co.uk/

Select
from Alphabetical listing:

A
B
C
D E
F G
H I
J K
L M
N O
P Q
R S
T U
V W

A

ABRAM: From
the 12th century Old English ” Adburgham ” meaning “a
homestead or enclosure belonging to a woman called Eadburh”. This
township used to be in Lancashire, and in the Ecclesiastical Parish
of Wigan. In 1880 Abram Local Board of Health was established for the
township. In 1894 the area became an Urban District and in 1974 it became
part of Wigan Metropolitan Borough.

AFFETSIDE:
A locality in the Bradshaw and Tottington townships of Bury.

AGECROFT:
A district within the Pendlebury township of Salford.

AINSWORTH:
From the Old English c12th century ” Haineswrthe ” meaning
“Enclosure of a man called Aegen”. This township used to be
in Lancashire. In 1933 it became part of Radcliffe Urban District and
was assumed into Bury Metropolitan Borough in 1974.

ALKRINGTON:
A parish in Lancashire originally, and in Oldham Ecclesiastical
Parish. In 1879 it came within the area of the commissioners for the
improvement of Middleton and Tonge townships and in 1886 was assumed
within the Middleton Borough – now in Rochdale Metropolitan Borough.

ALTRINCHAM:
The name first appears as ” Aldringeham ” – probably
meaning “Homestead of the Aldhere family”. The town was given
a charter by Hamon de Mersey sometime around 1290 but it had still not
been recognised as a borough in the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835.
Altrincham was then in Cheshire, and was in Bowdon Ecclesiastical Parish
and part of the Bucklow Poor Law Union (which was known as Altrincham
Union until 1895). In 1851 Altrincham Local Board of Health was established
for the township and in 1894 the area of the Local Board became Altrincham
Urban District. In 1920 parts of Carrington and Dunham Massey Civil
Parishes were added to it. In 1936 parts of Urban Districts of Bowdon
and Hale and the Civil Parishes of Dunham Massey and Timperley were
added. In 1937 Altrincham Urban District became a Municipal Borough
and in 1974 it became part of Trafford Metropolitan Borough, though
locals still regard it as being in Cheshire.

ANCOATS:
A locality in the City of Manchester township.
See Ancoats –
Main Entry.

APPLEY BRIDGE:
Area largely in Wrightington but also in Shevington and Upholland. Name
known to date from the 13th century as ” Appelleie ”
– “a bridge near the apple tree wood or clearing”. In Bolton
Metropolitan Borough.

ARDWICK:
The Civil Parish of Ardwick was in Lancashire, in Manchester Ecclesiastical
Parish, and part of the Chorlton Poor Law Union between 1837 and 1915,
and in Manchester Poor Law Union from 1915 to 1930. In 1838 it became
part of the Borough of Manchester. Under the Divided Parishes Act of
1882 part of Chorlton upon Medlock township was added to Ardwick.
See Ardwick – Main Entry.

ASHTON IN MAKERFIELD:
From 1212 AD, ” Eston ” – usually meaning “a farmstead
where ash trees grow”, which is a later addition to the original
” Macrefeld ” of 1121, an old Celtic word meaning “wall”
or “ruin”. This township of Ashton in Makerfield, (also known
as Ashton le Willows), was in Lancashire, in Winwick Ecclesiastical
Parish and in the Wigan Poor Law Union. In 1872 Ashton in Makerfield
Local Board of Health was established and in 1894 it became an Urban
District. In 1933 part of Haydock Urban District was added to it. In
1974 the South Ward (including the Garswood and Downall Green areas)
of the Urban District became part of St. Helens Metropolitan Borough
in the Merseyside County; the remainder became part of Wigan Metropolitan
Borough in the Greater Manchester County.

ASHTON UNDER
LYNE:
Known by 1160 AD as ” Haistune “, and by 1305
as ” Asshton under Lyme “. The Later part possibly derived
from the old Celtic word “lyme” meaning “elm tree region”
– this township was almost certainly originally part of the vast Lyme
Park estate. Ashton Town was one of the ancient divisions of Ashton
under Lyne township in Lancashire. It was in Ashton under Lyne Poor
Law Union. In 1898 there was an exchange of areas with Dukinfield Urban
District. In 1927 Hurst Urban District was added to the Borough In.
1935 parts of Hartshead were also added. Later, Waterloo, Alt, Bardsley
and Little Moss Civil Parishes were added. In 1974 the Borough became
part of Tameside Metropolitan Borough. Ashton township was also an ancient
Ecclesiastical Parish, which had four divisions : Ashton Town, Audenshaw,
Hartshead and Knott Lanes. These were sometimes referred to as townships
though they did not have legal status as such. Fifteen “hamlets” are
described in contemporary directories as acting for the maintenance
of highways. In 1847 the township became the Borough of Ashton under
Lyne. In 1857, part of the township was added to Stalybridge Borough,
and in 1880 another part was added to Oldham Borough. Yet another part
was added to Mossley Borough in 1885. Local Boards of Health were established
for the following areas, Lees (a Board at first called Lees with Crossbank)
in 1859, Hurst in 1861 and Audenshaw in 1874. In 1894 these became Lees,
Hurst and Audenshaw Urban Districts. In 1894 the remainder of the township
became Limehurst Rural District which was composed of Alt, Bardsley,
Crossbank, Hartshead, Little Moss Waterloo and Woodhouses. Stalybridge
Borough was wholly included in Cheshire in 1889, while the remainder
of what had been Ashton under Lyne township continued to be in Lancashire.
In 1974 Ashton became part of the Tameside Metropolitan Borough.

ASHTON UPON MERSEY:
Known in 1408 simply as ” Asshton “, probably originally
meaning “town where ash trees grow”. The “upon Mersey”
(next to the River Mersey) affix came later to identify it from all
other townships of that name. The parish of Ashton upon Mersey was originally
in Cheshire, in Ashton upon Mersey Ecclesiastical Parish and in Bucklow
Poor Law Union (which was called Altrincham Union) until 1895. In 1894
it became an Urban District. In 1908, as part of road widening for trams,
a part of Sale Urban District was added and in 1930 it became part of
Sale Urban District. It came into the Trafford Metropolitan Borough
in 1974.

ASHWORTH: This
township was in Lancashire until 1974. It was in Middleton Ecclesiastical
Parish and in Bury Poor Law Union. In 1894 it became part of Birtle
with Bamford township.

ASPULL: From
the Old English ” aespe “+ ” hyll ” meaning
“a place where aspen trees grow”, and known simply as ” Aspul ”
by 1212. This township or Civil Parish was originally in Lancashire,
and in Wigan Ecclesiastical Parish and Wigan Poor Law Union. In 1876,
Aspull. Local Board of Health was established for the township and in
1894 the area became an Urban District. In 1974 the Urban District became
part of Wigan Metropolitan Borough.

ASTLEY: From
the Old English “east” and “leah” meaning “east
wood or clearing”, known by 1210 as ” Astelegh e”.
This township or Civil Parish was in Leigh in the County of Lancashire,
as well as in Leigh Ecclesiastical Parish and in Leigh Poor Law Union.
In 1933 it became part of Tyldesley Urban District, and as such came
into the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan in 1974.

ASTLEY BRIDGE:
In 1864 Astley Bridge Local Board of Health was established for
parts of Sharples and Little Bolton. In 1894 the area became Astley
Bridge Urban District. In 1898 the Urban District was dissolved and
its area became part of Bolton Borough.

ATHERTON: Named
in 1212 as ” Aderton ” and meaning “farmstead or
village of a man called Aethelhere”. This township was originally
in Lancashire, in Leigh Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Leigh Poor
Law Union. In 1863 Atherton Local Board of Health was established and
in 1894 part of the township was added to Leigh Urban District; the
remainder became Atherton Urban District. In 1974 the Urban District
became part of Wigan Metropolitan Borough.

AUDENSHAW:
By c1200 known as ” Aldwynshawe ” and meaning “copse
or wood of a man called Aldwyne”. Audenshaw was an ancient division
of Ashton under Lyne township in Lancashire. In 1874 Audenshaw Local
Board of Health was established. In 1894 this area became Audenshaw
Urban District in the Ashton under Lyne Poor Law Union. In 1974 it became
part of Tameside Metropolitan Borough.

B

BAGULEY:This
parish was in Cheshire in the Bowdon Ecclesiastical Parish and in Bucklow
Poor Law Union (the so-called Altrincham Union) until 1895. In 1931
it became part of the City of Manchester. Its area was used for the
development of Wythenshawe housing estate.

BARDSLEY:
From the Old English, by 1442 known as ” Berdsley “,
probably meaning ” a woodland clearing of a man called Beornraëd”.
This parish was in Lancashire and was formed in 1894 from the area of
Ashton under Lyne township. It was in Ashton under Lyne Poor Law Union.
In 1951 part of it was added to Oldham Borough. In 1954 it was dissolved
and its area divided between Ashton under Lyne Borough, Oldham Borough
and Failsworth Urban District..

BARTON MOSS:
Barton was a common Old English name ” bere-tün ”
or ” baer-tün ” meaning a barley farm, or a place
where barley corn was stored. The Old English name ” mos ”
indicated a swamp or bog. This parish was in Lancashire and was formed
in 1894 from an area of the Barton upon Irwell township. It was in Barton
upon Irwell Poor Law Union. In 1896 parts of Irlam Urban District and
Davyhulme Civil Parish were added to it and there was an exchange of
areas between the parishes of Barton Moss and Flixton. In 1933 it was
dissolved and its area divided between Eccles Borough and Worsley Urban
District, both of which became part of Salford Metropolitan Borough
in 1974.

BARTON UPON
IRWELL:
A similar name derivation to Barton Moss (above) but with
the later affix “upon Irwell” (meaning “beside the River
Irwell”), to distinguish it from other places of the same name.
Barton upon Irwell hamlet or village developed north of a crossing over
the River Irwell, within the area of what became Eccles. The name “Barton”
or “Barton upon Irwell” has been used for a number of local government
areas. During the Middle Ages there are references to lands in the “vill”
or “Barton” or “Barton upon Irwell”; for this “vill”. In the northern
part of this township, the Barton, Eccles, Winton and Monton Local Board
of Health was established in 1854 and, with the addition of part of
Worsley township, the area of this Local Board largely became in 1892
that of Eccles Borough and Barton upon Irwell. The Barton upon Irwell
Rural District was established in 1894 and was then in Lancashire. It
comprised the townships or Civil Parishes of Barton Moss, Clifton, Davyhulme
and Flixton. The Rural District was dissolved in 1933. The actual township
of Barton Upon Irwell was in Eccles Ecclesiastical Parish. It was in
Chorlton Poor Law Union, 1841-49, and in Barton upon Irwell Poor Law
Union. In 1892 the Local Board was succeeded by Eccles Borough. The
area of Barton upon Irwell township included in Eccles Borough in 1892
was largely the same as had been included in the area of the former
Local Board; in addition, another part of Worsley township was included
in Eccles Borough in 1892. In 1894 Barton upon Irwell township was dissolved
and its area divided between Eccles Borough, Irlam Urban District and
Barton Moss and Davyhulme townships. Medieval records refer to lands
in this “vill”; some of these lands appear to have been in the neighbourhood
of Barton upon Irwell hamlet, others as distant as Farnworth township.

BESSES O’TH’BARN:
Hamlet, originally in the locality of Pilkington township, subsequently
in Whitefield township or Civil Parish, and as such it became part of
Bury Metropolitan Borough in 1974. This oddly named village, known locally
simply as “Besses”, is actually an old industrial town whose
name has potentially colourful origins. The most probable explanation
of the placename derives from one its most infamous pub landladies,
Elizabeth “Bess” Bamford, landlady of the local “Dog
Inn” from 1674-1699. She was known as Besses o’th Barn and this
almost certainly became the eventual name of the pub and of the district.

BESWICK:
The Old English affix “Wick” or “Wich” usually meant
to indicate a field. Beswick probably means “the field (or some
authorities believe “the dairy farm”) belonging to a man called
Bes”. This parish used to be in Lancashire, and was in Manchester
Ecclesiastical Parish. It was in Prestwich Poor Law Union from 1858-1915,
and in Manchester Poor Law Union from 1915-30. In 1838 it became part
of the Borough of Manchester, and now forms part of the City of Manchester.
See Beswick –
Main Entry.

BILLINGE:
By 1202 known simply as ” Bilinge ” from the Old English
word for “a sharp hill or ridge”. This parish used to be in
Lancashire and was in Wigan Ecclesiastical Parish. It came to be divided
into two separate townships, Billing Chapel End and Billinge Higher
End. These townships were in Wigan Poor Law Union. In 1872 Billinge
Local Board of Health was established for the area of these two townships
and two detached parts (one known as Blackley Hurst and the other situated
in the Carr Mill area, both lying within the area of Billinge Chapel
End township) of Winstanley township. In 1894 the area of the Local
Board (together with the remaining area of Winstanley township) became
Billinge Urban District. In 1927 the Urban District was renamed Billinge
and Winstanley Urban District. In 1974 the Billinge Higher End ward
and most of Winstanley ward became part of Wigan Metropolitan Borough
in the Greater Manchester County; the Billinge Chapel End area (including
the two former detached parts of Winstanley township) became part of
St. Helens Metropolitan Borough, in the Merseyside Metropolitan County.

BIRTLE WITH
BAMFORD:
This township, (also known as Birtle cum Bamford), was
in Lancashire in Middleton Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Bury Poor
Law Union. In 1867 part of it was included in Heywood Local Board of
Health. In 1872 part of it was included in the area of Bury improvement
commissioners. Under the Divided Parishes Act of 1882 parts of Walmersley
with Shuttleworth and Heap townships were added to it. In 1894 Ashworth
township and part of Heap township were added to it and part of it was
added to Walmersley with Shuttleworth township In 1933 it was dissolved
and its area divided between Bury, Rochdale and Heywood Boroughs.

BLACKLEY: From
the Old English ” blaec ” and ” leah ”
meaning “a dark wood or clearing” – known as “Blakely”
by 1282. This Civil Parish was in Lancashire in the Manchester Ecclesiastical
Parish and in the Manchester Poor Law Union between 1841-50, in the
Prestwich Poor Law Union from 1850-1915, and in Manchester Poor Law
Union from 1915-30. In 1890 it became part of the City of Manchester.
See Blackley – Main Entry.

BLACKLEY HURST:
Detached part of Winstanley township situated within Billinge Chapel
End township.

BLACKROD:
From two Old English words “blaec” and rodu”, known by
c1189 as ” Blacherode ” and meaning “dark clearing”.
This Civil Parish was in Lancashire, in Bolton (or Bolton le Moors)
Ecclesiastical Parish and in Wigan Poor Law Union. In 1872 Blackrod
Local Board of Health was established for the township. In 1894 the
Local Board became an Urban District. In 1974 the Urban District became
part of Bolton Metropolitan Borough.

BLATCHINWORTH
AND CALDERBROOK:
This Civil Parish was formed from the ancient township
of Hundersfield in Rochdale Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Rochdale
Poor Law Union. In 1870 part of it was Included in the area of Littleborough
Local Board of Health. In 1879 the Local Board of Health was extended
to include the rest of Blatchinworth and Calderbrook township. In 1894
the township was dissolved and the area of the Local Board became Littleborough
Urban District.

BOARSHAW
: Locality in Middleton township.

BOLLINGTON
: Literally meaning “a town or farmstead next to the River Bollin”
– the origin of the word “Bollin” is unknown. Parts of Bollington
Civil Parish were added to Bowdon Urban District and to Dunham Massey
Civil Parish.

BOLTON
: The nameplace is common in the north of England, from two
Old English words “böthl” and “tün” meaning
“a settlement with special builting”, and known by 1185 as
” Boelton “. The town of Bolton was granted a charter
by William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby; in 1253 but it was not recognised
as a borough in the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835. In 1838 Bolton
Borough was established, comprising in area Great Bolton township, part
of Little Bolton township and part (Haulgh area) of Tonge with Haulgh
township. These townships were all in Bolton (or Bolton le Moors) Ecclesiastical
Parish. (From 1792 to 1338 Great Bolton and Little Bolton townships
had Improvement Trustees (or police commissioners) for the improvement
of the respective townships). In 1872 part of Rumworth township was
added to the Borough and in 1877 part of Halliwell township. In 1889
it became a County Borough. It was in Bolton Poor Law Union. In 1898
Breightmet, Darcy Lever Deane (known before 1894 as Rumworth), Great
Lever, Heaton, Lostock, Middle Hulton, Smithills and Tonge Civil Parishes,
Astley Bridge Urban District and part of Over Hulton Civil Parish became
part of the Borough. In 1974 Bolton became a Metropolitan Borough. This
Metropolitan District in Greater Manchester County was formed from the
following local government areas: Bolton County Borough; Farnworth Municipal
Borough, Blackrod, Horwich, Kearsley, Little Lever and Westhoughton
Urban District and part (Bradshaw North, Bradshaw South, Bromley Cross
and Eagley wards and south part of Egerton ward) of Turton Urban District
of Lancashire. The former Bolton Rural District had, by 1894, comprised
the following townships or Civil Parishes: Bradshaw, Breightmet, Darcy
Lever, Halliwell, Heaton, Lostock, Middle Hulton, Over Hulton, Rumworth
Belmont Tongs (less Haulgh). In 1898 the Rural District was dissolved
and the Civil Parishes in it became part of Bolton Borough and Turton
and Westhoughton Urban Districts. See Bolton –
Main
Entry
.

BOOTHSTOWN:
Area partly in Worsley (subsequently in Salford Metropolitan District)
and partly in Tyldesley with Shakerley township, (subsequently in Wigan
Metropolitan Borough).

BOSDEN: This
township or Civil Parish was in Cheshire and its area had been in Handforth
cum Bosden township which in 1877 was divided into Bosden and Handforth
townships or Civil Parishes In 1900 Bosden Civil Parish became part
of Hazel Grove and Bramhall Urban District.

BOWDON: Known
from the Domesday Book of 1086 as ” Bogedone ” from 2
Old Saxon words “boga” and”dün” meaning “curved
hill”. This Civil Parish was in Cheshire in Bowdon Ecclesiastical
Parish and in the Bucklow Poor Law Union (the Altrincham Union). In
1936 part of it was added to Altrincham Urban District and part of Dunham
Massey Civil Parish was added to it. In 1936 parts of Bollington Urban
District and Dunham Massey Civil Parish were added to Bowdon Urban District
and parts of it were added to Hale and Altrincham Urban Districts. In
1974 Bowdon Urban District became part of Trafford Metropolitan Borough.

BRADFORD:
A common Old English placename meaning “a broad ford”. This
township or Civil Parish was in Lancashire in Manchester Ecclesiastical
Parish and in the Manchester Poor Law Union from 1841-50, in Prestwich
Poor Law Union from1850-1915, and in the Manchester Poor Law Union from
1915-30. In 1856 Bradford Local Board of Health was established for
the area of the township. In 1885 the township became part of the City
of Manchester. Not to be confused with the City of Bradford in
Yorkshire. See Bradford – Main Entry.

BRADSHAW:
From 2 Old English words “brad” and “sceaga” and
known by 1246 as ” Bradeshaghe “, meaning “broad
wood or copse”. This township or Civil Parish used to be in Lancashire.
It was in Bolton (or Bolton le Moors) Ecclesiastical Parish and in the
Bolton Poor Law Union. In 1898 it became part of Turton Urban District,
and in 1974 became part of Bolton Metropolitan Borough.

BRAMHALL:
Entered in the Domesday Book in 1086 as ” Bramale ” from
the Old English meaning “nook or place where the broom tree grows”.
This Civil Parish was originally in Cheshire in Stockport Ecclesiastical
Parish and in the Stockport Poor Law Union. In 1900 it became part of
Hazel Grove and Bramhall Urban District, and in 1974 became part of
Stockport Metropolitan Borough.

BRANDLESHOLME:
Locality in Elton township within Bury Metropolitan Borough.

BREDBURY & ROMILEY:
Bredbury is found in the Domesday Survey of 1086 as ” Bretberie ”
meaning a “stronghold or manor house built of planks”. Romiley,
also in Domesday was known as ” Rumelie “, meaning “a
spacious woodland clearing”. This township or Civil Parish was
in Cheshire in Stockport Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Stockport
Poor Law Union. In 1865 Bredbury Local Board of Health was established
for the township. In 1380 the township was included in the area of Bredbury
and Romiley Local Board of Health. The Bredbury & Romiley Urban District
was in Cheshire and comprised of the townships or Civil Parishes of
Bredbury and Romiley Both townships were in Stockport Ecclesiastical
Parish and in the Stockport Poor Law Union. In 1865 Bredbury Local Board
of Health was established for Bredbury township. In 1880 Bredbury was
included with Romiley in the area of Bredbury and Romiley Local Board
of Health. In 1894 this Local Board of Health became Bredbury and Romiley
Urban District. In 1901 part of Bredbury Civil Parish was added to Stockport
Borough and in 1902 the remaining area of Brinnington Civil Parish was
added to Bredbury Civil Parish. In 1936 parts of Compstall Urban District,
Hyde Borough and Marple Urban District were added to Bredbury and Romiley
Urban District and parts of the Urban District were added to Stockport
Borough and Marple Urban District. In 1952 part of Bredbury and Romiley
Urban District was added to Stockport Borough. In 1974 the Urban District
became part of Stockport Metropolitan Borough.

BREIGHTMET:
(Pronounced “br-ate-mit” by Boltonians). This township
or Civil Parish was in Lancashire. It was in Bolton (or Bolton-le-Moors)
Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Bolton Poor Law Union. In 1898 it became
part of Bolton Borough.

BRINDLE HEATH:
Locality in Pendleton township, formerly known as ” Brindlache “,
probably originally meaning “a hill or heath by a stream”
– (brindle is probably an old name for a stream). Now in Salford Metropolitan
Borough.

BRINKSWAY:
Locality in Cheadle township, subsequently in Stockport Borough.

BRINNINGTON:
This township or Civil Parish was in Cheshire in Stockport Ecclesiastical
Parish and in the Stockport Poor Law Union. In 1835 part of it was included
in Stockport Borough, In 1901 an additional part of it was added to
Stockport Borough. In 1902 the remaining area of the Civil Parish became
part of Bredbury Civil Parish.

BROADBOTTOM:
Known by 1286 as ” Brodebothem “, meaning a “broad
bottomed valley”. Locality in Mottram in Longdendale township.

BROMLEY CROSS:
Locality in Turton township in the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton.

BROOKBOTTOM:
Locality in Saddleworth township in Oldham Metropolitan Borough.

BROOKLANDS:
District in the Sale locality. From the Old English meaning “Cultivated
lands beside a brook”. Part of Trafford Metropolitan Borough.

BROOKSBOTTOM:
Locality in Elton, Tottington Lower End and Walmersley with Shuttleworth
townships The part in Walmersley with Shuttleworth township was also
known as Rowlands or as part of the Summerseat area – now in the Metropolitan
Borough of Bury.

BROUGHTON:
A common placename in Old English meaning a “farmstead by a brook”.
This Civil Parish was in Lancashire in Manchester Ecclesiastical Parish
and in the Salford Poor Law Union. Not to be confused with Broughton
township, near Preston, Lancashire. Includes Lower Broughton, Higher
Broughton and Broughton Park, as well as parts of Kersal. In 1844 part
and in 1853 the remaining area of the township was included in Salford
Borough. In 1851 Broughton Local Board of Health was established for
the area of the township.

BUCKLOW RURAL
DISTRICT:
This was formed in 1894 and was in Cheshire. The following
townships and Civil Parishes at some time lay within the Rural District
and were to become part of the Borough of Trafford in the Greater Manchester
County: Ashton upon Mersey, Baguley, Carrington, Dunham Massey, Northern
Etchells, Hale, Northenden, Partington, Ringway, Timperley, Warburton.

BULLOCK SMITHY:
A former name of the Hazel Grove area of Stockport.

BURNAGE:
This township or Civil Parish was formerly in Lancashire in Manchester
Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Chorlton Poor Law Union from 1837-1915,
and in Manchester Poor Law Union from1915-30. In 1876 it was included
in the area of Withington Local Board of Health. Under the Divided Parishes
Act of 1882 there was an exchange of areas with Withington township
and part of Didsbury township was added to Burnage township. In 1894
it became part of Withington Urban District. In 1904 it became part
of the City of Manchester.
See Burnage – Main Entry.

BURNDEN:
Locality in Great Bolton, Great Lever and Tonge with Haulgh townships.

BURY:
From the Old English ” Burh ” – “a place by the
fort or stronghold”, by 1194 known simply as ” Biri “.
This township or Civil Parish was in Lancashire, (and local people still
prefer to regard it as such). It was in Bury Ecclesiastical Parish and
in the Bury Poor Law Union. In 1846 commissioners were established for
the improvement of Bury township and part of Elton township. In 1872
parts of Birtle with Bamford, Heap, Pilsworth, Radcliffe, Walmersley
with Shuttleworth, Tottington Lower End and Elton townships were included
in the area of the commissioners. In 1876 Bury Borough was established.
In 1885 parts of Elton, Tottington tower End, Walmersley with Shuttleworth
and Pilkington townships were added to the Borough. Bury Rural District
was in Lancashire. In 1894 it comprised the following townships : Ainsworth,
Birtle with Bamford Walmersley with Shuttleworth, Outwood and Unsworth.
In 1889 the Parish and the Rural District became a County Borough. In
1911 part of Radcliffe Urban District was added to it and in 1933 parts
of Heywood Borough, Tottington Urban District and Birtle with Bamford,
Unsworth and Walmersley with Shuttleworth Civil Parishes. Also in 1933
there was an exchange of areas with Radcliffe Urban District and part
of Bury Borough was added to Ramsbottom Urban District. In 1937 a very
small part of Whitefield Urban District was added to the Borough. In
1974 it became part of Bury Metropolitan Borough, which was formed in
1974 from the following local government areas: Bury County Borough,
Prestwich and Radcliffe Municipal Boroughs, Tottington and Whitefield
Urban Districts and part (Central, East, South and West wards) of Ramsbottom
Urban District in Lancashire. See also Bury –
Main
Entry
.

BUTTERWORTH:
This township or Civil Parish was in Lancashire. It was in Rochdale
Ecclesiastical Parish and in Rochdale Poor Law Union. In 1870 Milnrow
Local Board.

C

CADISHEAD :
Locality in Irlam Urban District. Known by 1212 as ” Cadewalsate “,
and meaning a “dwelling or fold by the stream of a man called Cada”.

CALDERBROOK:
Locality in Blatchinworth and Calderbrook township.

CAPTAIN FOLD: Locality in Hopwood township.

CARRBROOK: Locality in Stayley township.

CARRINGTON:
By the 12th century known as ” Carrintona “. Several
possible meanings or explanations of the placename. 1). an estate or
lands belonging to a man called Cara, or 2). from the Old English for
caring (tending, herding or watching over – indicating sheep or cattle
pastures), or 3). “caering” from an Old English word meaning
“river bend”. This township or Civil Parish was in Cheshire.
It was in Bowdon Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Bucklow Poor Law Union
(the so-called Altrincham Union) until 1895. In 1920 there were exchanges
of areas with Flixton Civil Parish and Irlam Urban District. Also in
1920 part of the Civil Parish was added to Altrincham Urban District.
In 1974 the Civil Parish became part of Trafford Metropolitan Borough.

CARR MILL:
This area in Billinge Chapel End township included a detached part of
Winstanley township.

CASTLETON:
Common placename in Old English, simply meaning “a place or town
near a castle”. This township or Civil Parish was in Lancashire.
It was in Rochdale Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Rochdale Poor Law
Union. In 1825 part of it was included in the area of the improvement
commissioners for the town of Rochdale. In 1867 part of it was included
in the area of Heywood Local Board of Health and in 1881 became part
of Heywood Borough. In 1870 Buersill Local Board of Health was established
for part of the township; in 1872 part of the area of this Local Board
was included in Rochdale Borough and in 1873 the Local Board ceased
to exist. In 1875 Castleton by Rochdale Local Board of Health was established
for part of the township; in 1879 parts of Hopwood and Thornham townships
were included in the area of this Local Board. In 1879 another part
of Castleton township was included in the area of Milnrow Local Board
of Health and in 1894 became part of Milnrow Urban District. In 1894
the area of Castleton by Rochdale Local Board of Health became Castleton
by Rochdale Urban District which in 1896 was renamed Castleton Urban
District. In 1900 this Urban District was dissolved and its area divided
between Rochdale and Heywood Boroughs.

CATLEY LANE:
Locality in Spotland township

CHADDERTON:
By c1200 known simply as ” Chaderton “, meaning “farmstead
at the hill called ” Cadeir ” (Celtic word meaning “chair”).
This Civil Parish was in Lancashire in Prestwich with Oldham Ecclesiastical
Parish and in the Oldham Poor Law Union. In 1713 it was agreed that
20 acres of the Hollinwood area were to be in this township and the
rest in Oldham township. In 1880 part of Oldham Borough (in the Hollinwood
area) was added to the township and part (including Chadderton near
Hollins) of the township were added to Oldham Borough. In 1894 the area
of the Local Board became an Urban District. In 1933 there were exchanges
of areas with the City of Manchester and Middleton Borough. In 1974
the Urban District became part of Oldham Metropolitan Borough.

CHADWICK:
Locality in Spotland township. Possibly named from Old English meaning
a “field belonging to a man called Chad”.

CHAPELFIELD:
Locality in Pilkington township, subsequently in Radcliffe Borough and
now in Bury Metropolitan Borough. Simply meaning “the chapel in
the field”.

CHAPELTOWN:
Locality in Turton township of Bolton. Simply meaning “the chapel
by the town”.

CHARLESTOWN:
An area in Pendleton township of Salford.

CHAT MOSS:
A peat bog, some 10 square miles in area, extending into areas subsequently
part of Salford Metropolitan District or Wigan Metropolitan Borough.
Reclaimed for cultivation during the last century

CHEADLE & GATLEY:
Cheadle is really 2 words combined – originally in Celtic ” Ced ”
(pronounced “ched”) meaning “wood” – the “Legh ”
part (also meaning “wood”) is an Old English term that was
added later in explanation – technically the town therefore means “Wood
wood”. By the time of Domesday in 1086 it was known as ” Cedde ”
and by c1165 it had become known as ” Chedle “. The name
Gatley is known from 1290 as ” Gateclyve “, meaning a
bank or cliffs whereon goats were kept”. This township or Civil
Parish as in Cheshire and was formed in 1879 by the merging of Cheadle
Buckeley and Cheadle Moseley (an area now know as Cheadle Hulme) townships
or Civil Parishes. Both townships were in Cheadle Ecclesiastical Parish
and in Stockport Poor Law Union. In 1835 parts of Cheadle Bulkeley and
Cheadle Moseley townships had been included in Stockport Borough. In
1886 the area of Cheadle township outside Stockport Borough was included
in the area of Cheadle and Gatley Local Board of Health. In 1886 Cheadle
and Gatley Local Board of Health was established for the area of Stockport
Etchells township and the part of Cheadle township outside Stockport
Borough. In 1894 the area of the Local Board became Cheadle and Gatley
Urban District in Cheshire. It was in the Stockport Poor Law union.
In 1901 part of the Urban District was added to Wilmslow Urban Borough
and part of Handforth Urban District was added to Cheadle and Gatley
Urban District. In 1974 the Urban District became part of Stockport
Metropolitan Borough.

CHEADLE BUCKELEY:
Former Cheadle township. As above. Buckeley may be derived from ” Buck-legh ”
an Old English term indicating a field where bucks (male deer) were
kept. Therefore probably “the deer field belonging to the town
of Cheadle”.

CHEADLE HULME:
Formerly called Cheadle Moseley. As above. Hulme is derived from an
old word ” hulm ” meaning “water meadow”, 12th
century , therefore “a water meadow belonging to the town of Cheadle”..

CHEETHAM HILL:
This township or Civil Parish was in Lancashire in Manchester Ecclesiastical
Parish. It was in the Manchester Poor Law Union from 1841-50, in the
Prestwich Poor Law Union from 1850-1915, and in Manchester Poor Law
Union from 1915-30. In 1838 it became part of the Borough of Manchester
and became known as Cheetham Hill. There was a Cheetham Committee of
the Borough or City Council until 1875. See also
Cheetham
– Main Entry
.

CHEQUERBENT:
Locality in Westhoughton township of Bolton Metropolitan Borough.

CHESHAM:
Locality in Bury Township. Placename possibly dating back to 1086, perhaps
meaning “river meadow by a heap of stones”.

CHEW MOOR:
Locality in Lostock and Rumworth township, now in Bolton Metropolitan
Borough. Names in the Domesday Survey of 1086, from the Celtic ” Ciu ”
meaning “a river”.

CHORLTON CUM
HARDY
: Chorlton may have come from an Old English word ” ceorl ”
meaning “farmstead of peasants or freemen”, and this township
was known in 1243 as ” Cholreton “. This was later combined
with Hardy, neighbouring lands, from 1555, (from the Old English meaning
“hard island”) and has been known as Chorlton-cum-Hardy since
that time. This township or Civil Parish was formerly in Lancashire
in Manchester Ecclesiastical Parish. It was in Chorlton Poor Law Union
from 1837-1915 and in Manchester Poor Law Union from 1915-30. In 1876
it was included in the area of Withington Local Board of Health. Under
the Divided Parishes Act of 1882 part of Withington township was added
to Chorlton cum Hardy township. In 1894 it became part of Withington
Urban District. In 1904 it became part of the City of Manchester. See
Chorlton-cum-Hardy – Main
Entry
.

CHORLTON UPON
MEDLOCK
: Nameplace as above, but with the later affix of “upon
Medlock” (meaning “beside the River Medlock”) to distinguish
it from the former. This township (before 1832 known as Chorlton Roe)
was in Lancashire in Manchester Ecclesiastical Parish. It was in Chorlton
Poor Law Union from 1837-1915, and in Manchester Poor Law Union from
1915-1930. In 1838 it became part of the Borough of Manchester. From
1822 to 1842 police commissioners had powers for the improvement of
the area of the township and from 1842 to 1875 there was a Chorlton
upon Medlock Committee of Manchester Borough or City Council. Under
the Divided Parishes Act of 1882 part of the township was added to Ardwick
township. See also: Chorlton on Medlock – Main
Entry
.

CLAYTON:
District of Manchester. Placename from the Old English, meaning “farmstead
or township on clayey soil”. This are formed the western part of
Droylsden township or Civil Parish, Lancashire. In 1863 Droylsden Local
Board of Health was formed for the whole area of the township but in
1890 the Clayton area became part of the City of Manchester; it was
also in Prestwich Poor Law Union from 1894-1915, and in Manchester Poor
Law Union from 1915-1930. The remaining eastern part of Droylsden township
became, in 1894, Droylsden Urban District; in 1974 Droylsden Urban District
became part of Tameside Metropolitan Borough.
See Clayton – Main Entry.

CLIFTON:
This township or Civil Parish was in Lancashire. It was in Eccles Ecclesiastical
Parish and in Barton Upon Irwell Poor Law Union. In 1933 it was dissolved
and its areas divided between Kearsley Urban District and Swinton and
Pendlebury Urban District. Now part of Salford metropolitan Borough.

COBHOUSE FARM:
An area in Warmersley with Shuttleworth township transferred to Birtle
with Bamford township under the Divided Parishes Act of 1882.

COCKEY MOOR:
Locality in Ainsworth township

COLLYHURST:
Locality in Manchester township in the City of Manchester.
See Collyhurst – Main Entry.

COMPSTALL:
Werneth was a township or Civil Parish in Cheshire. It was in Stockport
Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Stockport Poor Law Union. In 1877 part
of Werneth township was included in the area of Hyde Local Board of
Health and in 1881 became part of Hyde Borough. In 1897 the remaining
area of the Civil Parish was renamed Compstall Civil Parish. In 1902
it became an Urban District. In 1936 the Urban District was dissolved
and its area divided between Hyde Borough (now Tameside) and Bredbury
and Romiley Urban District (now Stockport).

CROMPTON:
This Civil Parish was in Lancashire. It was in Prestwich with Oldham
Ecclesiastical Parish and in Oldham Poor Law Union. In 1873 Crompton
Local Board of Health was formed for the township. In 1894 the area
Board became an Urban District. In 1974 it became part of Oldham Metropolitan
Borough.

CROSSBANK:
In 1859 a Local Board of Health (at first known as Lees with Crossbank,
later as Lees) was formed for the Lees area in Ashton under Lyne township.
The name Crossbank is thought by some to derive from the days of the
knights templar when a cross was etched into an earthen bank to denote
lands granted to them. It was in Ashton under Lyne Poor Law Union. In
1911 part of Lees Urban District was added to it. In 1914 it became
part of Lees Urban District. Now part of Oldham Metropolitan Borough.

CRUMPSALL:
This township or Civil Parish was in Lancashire. It was in Manchester
Poor Law Union from 1841-50, in Prestwich Poor Law Union from 1850-1915,
and in Manchester Poor Law Union from 1915-30. In 1854 Crumpsall Local
Board of Health was established for the township. In 1890 the township
became part of the City of Manchester. See Crumpsall – Main
Entry
.

CULCHETH:
Known in 1201 as ” Culchet ” probably from the Celtic
meaning “a narrow wood”. This township was formerly in Lancashire.
It was in Winwick Ecclesiastical Parish and in the Leigh Poor Law Union.
It should not be confused with the Culcheth area in Newton township,
Manchester. It had four ancient, ill-defined quarters, called Culcheth
(in the north), Holcroft (in the east), Peasfurlong (in the west) and
Risley (in the south). In 1933 the Civil Parish was dissolved and its
area divided between Golborne Urban District (Culcheth), Croft Civil
Parish (Holcroft, Peasfurlong and part of Risley areas) and Woolston
Civil Parish (remaining part of Risley area). In 1974, Croft, Woolston
and the Culcheth and Newchurch wards of Golbourne Urban District, i.e.
including the whole of the area of the former Civil Parish of Culcheth,
became part of Warrington District, Cheshire.


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This page last updated 27 Apr 09.